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Breeding Own Unique Varieties

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Obispo45
Joined: 6/11/2005
Location: SE Minnesota Re-Zoned as 4.51a
Posts: 145
Posted: Aug/26/2005 2:16 AM PST

Miss living in CA here and there(but daily in Minnesota February's ) Jennyspray. Especially miss the farmer's markets and picking up a good bottle of vino at the grocery store among other simple pleasures. Never knew I could purchase bright pink or yellow oyster mushrooms. Or purple carrots, or blood oranges, orange eggplant...could go on and on...LOL. In hindsight the ventures to the farmer's markets is what got me going. Suppose I have a special affection for the unusual or unknown.

Sounds like a cool cross. Like both of those veggies, but grow neither at this time. Been doing a bunch of reading, have come across lots of "older" very informative publications, but not much great web stuff. Positive what worked decades or more than a century ago(essentially 100% organic back then) is often appropriate for the home gardener today. Should be a learning experience. However do not think I'll be trying it for a bit. Have plans for building a small greenhouse. Half my materials are here, probabaly get started after back to school. Will whole heartedly attempt it at some point sooner than later though. If i find any info at all regarding that cross I'll post back or PM you. cheers
jennyspray
Joined: 5/26/2005
Location: VISALIA, CA.
Posts: 124
Posted: Aug/22/2005 7:40 AM PST

I have so been wanting to do the same thing, Anyone ever have a broccoilflower? Its a cross (duh) between a brocc. and a cauli> They sell them at the local Albertsons and I want to know how I can grow them myself. Obispo if you figure this out please let me know.
Obispo45
Joined: 6/11/2005
Location: SE Minnesota Re-Zoned as 4.51a
Posts: 145
Posted: Aug/01/2005 5:18 AM PST

Ooohhh no. I did not mean it like that..LOL . I hope I never have all the answers regarding a particular subject, hobby, discipline..etc. I've been called many things but never an authority, so to speak. Authorities look like they work and study too much
MamaBearBSA photos
Joined: 8/14/2002
Location: Altoona, Iowa (near Des Moines)
Posts: 4992
Moderator
Posted: Aug/01/2005 3:58 AM PST

It's the willingness to ask questions and keep learning that bring excitement to the whole field of gardening. I don't think you EVER have ALL the answers.
MamaBearBSA photos
Joined: 8/14/2002
Location: Altoona, Iowa (near Des Moines)
Posts: 4992
Moderator
Posted: Aug/01/2005 1:15 AM PST

I don't have the patience. I like to see quick results.
Obispo45
Joined: 6/11/2005
Location: SE Minnesota Re-Zoned as 4.51a
Posts: 145
Posted: Aug/01/2005 3:47 AM PST

I hear what you both are saying. I have little time as it is with my present veggies and even less patience , but just want to give it an honest attempt at some point in the near future. Actually I am very patient, one of the many reasons why I think I could make this work...have you seen the moniker under my name? "Greenthumb by 2026" Obviously only half serious, doubt I'll ever have answers to half the questions .
zergas
Joined: 6/23/2004
Location: Mi z5b
Posts: 145
Posted: Aug/01/2005 12:52 AM PST

wow i dont have enough time as is for my garden ...cant imagine trying to breed my own varieties
Obispo45
Joined: 6/11/2005
Location: SE Minnesota Re-Zoned as 4.51a
Posts: 145
Posted: Jul/31/2005 4:38 AM PST

Has anyone here ever done it? With what kind of veggie? What's a good kind of vegetable to start with? Any good resources, books or publications you could recommend? Is this OK? Am I "tainting" heirloom purity?

I save some seeds..couple tomato and chile cultivars that are isolated far enough from the others so that cross-pollination doesn't occur and a funky basil as well this year. I obviously haven't been doing this for long(gardening in general) and am sailing uncharted waters so to speak. Mainly I just want to experiment, spend a lot of time outdoors and have fun. Realize things do not happen overnight and it could take a while to stabilize a new variety or select for certain characteristics. I'm up for it. I know I could look at various places online or borrow books from the college library but just prefer to hear from people who may have been there and done that , or just want to give their two cents. Any help, advice or questions are much appreciated. Have a great weekend
Kristine
Joined: 3/12/2006
Location: Niagara Wine Country - Zone 6/7
Posts: 38
Posted: Mar/13/2006 1:02 AM PST

Last summer, a local squash grower was selling a cross between delicata and spaghetti squash: it had the size and appearance of a delicata, and the strings of the spaghetti. It was great! Perfect for one dinner/two servings. The usual rugby-ball spag squashes get a little tiresome after you're eating it for the third day in a row.

I'd love to try this cross. OTOH, knowing my luck, I'd end up with a cucumber-flavoured canteloupe with spaghetti strings.
Sorellina
Joined: 4/03/2006
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 80
Posted: Apr/05/2006 2:53 PM PST

Obispo,

I'd get Carol Deppe's book:Breed Your Own Vegetable Varieties. It's got a lot of good information in it, from plant genetics to seed saving techniques. It's technical, but it won't put you to sleep. Scoot over to Amazon and you can have a peek at the table of contents to get an idea if it would be a good resource for you.

Buona fortuna,
Julianna
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