Hummingbird in my new planter!

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Rashell blog photos
Joined: 9/17/2007
Location: Acton, Ca
Posts: 4230
Posted: May/18/2010 9:36 AM PST

humminbirds sure do love salvia!

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Rashell blog photos
Joined: 9/17/2007
Location: Acton, Ca
Posts: 4230
Posted: May/18/2010 9:39 AM PST

okay how come no one told me i spelled hummingbird wrong?

edit: i spelled it right the first time.
witt blog photos
Joined: 3/28/2008
Location: Lancaster, SC
Posts: 16643
Moderator
Posted: May/18/2010 11:29 AM PST

I don't think spelling counts here! It's the content that matters. You still get an A + from this old teacher!
Rashell blog photos
Joined: 9/17/2007
Location: Acton, Ca
Posts: 4230
Posted: May/18/2010 12:06 PM PST

still i'm sooooo i went back and spelled all the "hummingbirds" wrong, thinking i spelled it wrong the first time. haffta fix it soon.

thanks witt, big hugs! k...gotta go to work.
cougar blog photos
Joined: 8/24/2008
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 1184
Posted: May/18/2010 3:09 PM PST

I had a few last year Rashell but as soon as they ate to their hearts content...they left. I have feeders and was very diligent with them every three or four days i put fresh up but they never touched them. The few that visited ate the plants but NO FEEDERS. I don't know why.
Rashell blog photos
Joined: 9/17/2007
Location: Acton, Ca
Posts: 4230
Posted: May/19/2010 12:06 AM PST

well this kind of answers my question about why they love salvia so much

http://www.hummingbirds.net/hainsworth.html

We found that sugar concentrations differ widely among plant species, so no single sugar-water concentration is representative of all flower nectars that hummingbirds eat. The lowest sugar concentration we found was 10 calories in flowers of Iris missouriensis in the mountains of southeastern Arizona, while the highest, 82 calories, was for a Salvia in the Sonoran Desert in the same region.

The mean average sugar concentration for 65 plant species was 32 calories; the highest concentration was more than twice that, while the lowest was more than three times less than the average. This means hummingbirds will eat more or less frequently depending on the sugar concentration of nectar in the flowers they visit.


This might help you out Cougar but to really understand what I've cut and pasted here from the site you'll have to read the long article at the site.

Although a higher caloric food in a feeder is more efficient for the birds, it decreases their feeding activity. It helps if neighbors coordinate changes in sugar-water concentrations because hummingbirds always prefer a higher sugar-water concentration.
witt blog photos
Joined: 3/28/2008
Location: Lancaster, SC
Posts: 16643
Moderator
Posted: May/19/2010 2:47 AM PST

Thanks for that interesting information!
cougar blog photos
Joined: 8/24/2008
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 1184
Posted: May/19/2010 7:15 AM PST

Rashell I REALLY appreciate the info and will go visit the site. Unfortunately, my neighbors could care less about feeding hummers, birds. I stick out like a sore thumb with my feeders, watering holes for the birds, bird feeders, squirrel feeders...just the way I like it! TO them it is a nuisance to have any type of wildlife in their yard, oh for gawd sakes...I need to stop now. Heee
Rashell blog photos
Joined: 9/17/2007
Location: Acton, Ca
Posts: 4230
Posted: May/19/2010 10:30 AM PST

Quote:
Originally posted by witt
Thanks for that interesting information!


cougar's question lead me to it.
Rashell blog photos
Joined: 9/17/2007
Location: Acton, Ca
Posts: 4230
Posted: May/19/2010 10:32 AM PST

Quote:
Originally posted by cougar
Rashell I REALLY appreciate the info and will go visit the site. Unfortunately, my neighbors could care less about feeding hummers, birds. I stick out like a sore thumb with my feeders, watering holes for the birds, bird feeders, squirrel feeders...just the way I like it! TO them it is a nuisance to have any type of wildlife in their yard, oh for gawd sakes...I need to stop now. Heee


well fewey on your neighbors then!

"watering holes for the birds"?

Edit: this just gave me an idea too! I have two pine tree stumps in the front planter I just finished. I wonder if I can dig out a big hole in the 2 pine tree stumps then add water in 'em for the birds...instead of putting bird baths in it? Maybe seal the holes of the pine tree with something?
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