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Help! My pumpkins are dying!

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JustinVero
Joined: 6/28/2008
Location: Vero Beach, FL
Posts: 2
Posted: Jun/28/2008 2:18 PM PST

Hello, just wondering if anyone might be able to help me out. My pumpkin patch I planted has been growing very well, all seems healthy. The only thing I notice is one of the vines leaves are all variegated, green and light green/yellow color. Only one of the vines is producing fruits so far, I'd say about 10, but they all get the be the size of a baseball and a couple a little larger and they turn brown and dir. No holes in them, no bugs around them or inside (I cut a couple open to check). Any ideas? I would really like to have some healthy pumpkins! Thanks! I'l try to post pics of the leaves and fruits later.
JustinVero
Joined: 6/28/2008
Location: Vero Beach, FL
Posts: 2
Posted: Jun/28/2008 3:54 PM PST

here are some pictures

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CarolineC blog photos
Joined: 7/14/2007
Location: SE Pennsylvania zone 6b
Posts: 393
Posted: Jun/30/2008 8:06 AM PST

Well, the most obvious problem with any kind of squash where that happens is that it is not getting properly pollinated. You can pollinate them yourself, if that is indeed the problem. Pick off a male flower (the flower attached to a long stem), pull off its petals and brush that into the middle of the female flower (the flower at the end of the little pumpkin). Other than that, it could have a fungal infection, for which a fungicide can help, or a lack of calcium or some other nutrient. The yellowing leaves could even be simply a lack of water. But, I'm guessing that they just aren't getting pollinated properly.
gardendude blog photos
Joined: 4/08/2008
Location: Richmond, VA
Posts: 241
Posted: Jun/30/2008 12:45 PM PST

My guesses would be either not enough water (squashes seem to like their soil being constantly moist) or a calcium deficiency, based on the appearance of your leaves. You can probably find some vegetable food at Lowes or your local nursery. Make sure it has a high percentage of calcium
Lastniceguy photos
Joined: 3/01/2009
Location: So Cal
Posts: 135
Posted: Mar/04/2009 6:13 PM PST

the 2nd pic looks like powdery mildew. Baking soda and water to treat. I know this is a yr late but maybe will help next time.
biyu_wolf_77 blog photos
Joined: 3/05/2008
Location: around
Posts: 1764
Posted: Mar/04/2009 8:52 PM PST

what ratios?
pharmerphil blog photos
Joined: 12/01/2008
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 38
Posted: Mar/05/2009 2:32 PM PST

Lastniceguy is correct, Downy Mildew, I mix 4 teaspoons (about 1 rounded tablespoon) of baking soda and 1 tablespoon of horticultural oil, vegetable oil into one gallon of water. Spray lightly on foliage of plants,Undersides too. only in the early morning or evening, not in the sun.
Looks as though there may be a little Powdery mildew mixed in there too.
Unfortunately, most Fixes, aren't fixes at all, rather preveitives.
You might try Milk and water, I have went as high as a 1;1 raio...extreme case though, a quart to a gallon will snuff powdery mildew out, even on Lilac, peas, and cucumbers.
The spraying will be tough, but good coverage is needed
Lastniceguy photos
Joined: 3/01/2009
Location: So Cal
Posts: 135
Posted: Mar/05/2009 3:37 PM PST

I read about using a fungicde on the soil b4 planting to prevent it but I can't remember which one. I'll try to find it.
pharmerphil blog photos
Joined: 12/01/2008
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 38
Posted: Mar/06/2009 5:23 AM PST

Quote:
Originally posted by Lastniceguy
I read about using a fungicde on the soil b4 planting to prevent it but I can't remember which one. I'll try to find it.

yes there are things you can add to the soil, but I don't use chemicals of any type, and that is what they are for the most part.
A high organic content in your soil helps.
My best defense is solarization of the soil in areas these crops are planted...someday I'll post some pumpkin pictures in my album her..they just lil ones
Lastniceguy photos
Joined: 3/01/2009
Location: So Cal
Posts: 135
Posted: Mar/24/2009 7:20 PM PST

It is ordinary corn meal at a rate of 2 lbs per hundred sq feet.
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