Page 1 of 1[1]

raspberry bushes

Most Active Topic:
Most Recent Topic:
Member Message
gigges
Joined: 6/07/2007
Location: Ontario
Posts: 4
Posted: Oct/02/2007 9:45 AM PST

First year in our new house and i was very excited to see a few rapberry bushes in the back. They didn't turn out so good, only a bit of fruit. The people before us never took care of their garden/flowers. Is there anything i can do to save the bushes??
mcmartian
Joined: 4/29/2008
Location: NY State
Posts: 121
Posted: May/01/2008 6:20 AM PST

I'd recommend thinning the bush and maybe fertilizing. there's a specific time of year to fertilize raspberry bushes though. I don't remember when that is though.

many people recommend puting the raspberries on fence/trellis's and tying the canes 2 different colors. that way you can tell which is the 2nd year growth and cut it down after it stops producing. my family just let the bushes be a mess for 20 years and then thinned them and then let them go wild again. we got better production after the thinning but always had enough berries the other years too. so not sure how much fussing is necessary.

if the production is really bad you could mow down the entire patch at the end of the fall. doing that might stunt the 1st crop of the next year but the root of the berry plant is the perenial part and it'll survive practically anything.

good luck,
CarolineC blog photos
Joined: 7/14/2007
Location: SE Pennsylvania zone 6b
Posts: 393
Posted: May/01/2008 7:24 AM PST

It also depends on whether they are everbearing, or 2nd year cane fruting, which you probably don't know. If they are everbearing, you would want to cut them down to 4" tall in the fall. The next summer, they would bear fruit without needing to be trellised probably. If they bear on two year old canes, then like mcmartian said, you would want to thin them out, leaving some canes tall for fruit production in the spring. Also, from what I have read, raspberry bushes are only supposed to last about 15 years, and after that, they can decline in productivity. But I'll bet that if you trim them, and weed around them, maybe a little fertilizer, you'll see improvement next year. I don't actually have raspberry bushes (yet ), so this is just from what I have read.
mcmartian
Joined: 4/29/2008
Location: NY State
Posts: 121
Posted: May/01/2008 6:26 PM PST

15 years, hmm that's interesting. my grandfather transplanted wild raspberry bushes from the woods to his garden. they're still going 60+ years later. but I woudln't expect it to be the original plants alive, but original or decendents we can't tell the difference.

good to know, though, guess i got an excuse to buy a few more each year now.
CarolineC blog photos
Joined: 7/14/2007
Location: SE Pennsylvania zone 6b
Posts: 393
Posted: May/02/2008 3:06 AM PST

Yeah, that's probably what happened... they produced new canes from runners, so the originals are probably long gone.
Page 1 of 1[1]
Read Next Discussion
You must be a registered member to participate in the forums. Login or register below.


or Create an account