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Canning In The 4 & 6 Quart Pressure Cookers

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Amigatec
Joined: 8/19/2006
Location: Oklahoma Zone 6b
Posts: 179
Posted: Aug/19/2006 10:48 PM PST

I emailed Presto (I have 2 of their 6 qt cookers) - got an email and a tel call.

You can use pressure cookers for canning - two points - do not use over 3000 ft altitude - and use the instructions for canning in pressure COOKERS specifically. They emailed them - I've attached them
below.

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CANNING IN THE 4 & 6 QUART PRESSURE COOKERS

Pressure canning is recommended by the United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C., as the only safe method for canning low-acid foods - vegetables, meat, poultry, and fish. These
instructions for canning at 15 pounds pressure are according to research done by the Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Agriculture Experiment Station, University of Minnesota, St. Paul,
Minnesota.

National Presto Industries, Inc.
3925 North Hastings Way
Eau Claire, WI 54703-3703

1-800-368-2194 Home Economist
1-800-877-0441 Parts and Service

Why Pressure Canning?

Water boils at 212 degrees F. (except in mountainous regions) and this is sufficient to arrest or destroy some spoilage organisms - enzymes, molds, and yeast. However, a temperature of 240 degrees F. or above is needed to destroy harmful bacteria, especially clostridium botulinum. In pressure canning, some of the water in the Pressure cooker is converted to steam and, after all air is exhausted through the vent pipe and air vent/cover lock in the cover, the pressure regulator is placed on the vent pipe. Expanding steam will close the air vent/cover lock and will then create pressure. As pressure within the pressure cooker increases, temperature increases to 15 pounds pressure -- 250(F.

Four specific agents produce food spoilage. They are enzymes, molds, yeast and bacteria. Three of them (enzymes, molds and yeasts) are easily destroyed by heat during the processing. Bacteria, especially clostridium botulinum, can be destroyed only with temperatures above boiling. And their destruction is of prime importance. If enzymes are not destroyed, the quality of food is lowered. Unchecked mold may spread through the entire contents of a container of food. Yeast causes fermentation. Bacteria spoilage fall into four groups:
1) Fermentation, recognized by the formation of gas and acid, which causes
food to sour
2) Flat Sour, in which acid is produced, but no gas is formed
3) Putrefaction, characterized by gas, bad odor and sometimes by darkening of food
4) Toxins or poisonous substances which may show no visible signs of spoilage unless other spoilage organisms are also present

As a safeguard against using canned foods that may be affected with spoilage that is not readily detected, heat all low-acid foods (all meats and all vegetables) to 15 pounds pressure before tasting or using.

Pour canned food into a pressure cooker. Close cover securely. Place pressure regulator on vent pipe. When pressure attains 15 pounds, remove pressure cooker from heat. Let pressure drop of its own accord. Another method to detect food spoilage is to pour canned food into a saucepan and boil 10 - 15 minutes before tasting or using.

Many times odors that cannot be detected in the cold product will become evident by these methods. If after pressure cooking or boiling, food does not smell or look right, discard it without tasting.

Foods, such as fruits and tomatoes, may also be canned in a pressure cooker.

Canning Vegetables

Young, tender, fresh vegetables, slightly immature, are better for canning than overripe produce. As a rule, vegetables are best if canned immediately after picking, since flavor decreases upon standing and
often unpleasant color changes take place. Avoid bruising vegetables because spoilage organisms grow more rapidly on bruised vegetables than on unblemished ones.

Wash and prepare garden fresh vegetables as you would for cooking. Vegetables may be raw packed or precooked before they are processed. If raw, pack prepared vegetables into clean jars.

To precook vegetables, cover with boiling water and cook until heated through. Pack precooked vegetables into clean jars. Leave one inch head space in jars.

Can with or without salt. If salt is desired use only pure canning salt. Table salt contains a filler which may cause cloudiness in bottom of jars. Add 1/2 teaspoon canning salt to each pint jar (1/4 teaspoon salt to each one-half pint) if desired. Cover vegetables with boiling water leaving one inch head space.

When vegetables are precooked, some of the nutrients dissolve in the water. So whenever possible, the precooking water should be used as liquid to cover the vegetables. However, do not use the precooking water for canning turnips, greens, kale and sometimes asparagus, because the precooking water may be bitter.

Adjust cap closure according to manufacturer's instructions. Follow the specific directions for the operations of your cooker. Place boiling water, cooking rack and jars in the cooker. Close cover securely. Do not place the pressure regulator on the vent pipe. Exhaust air from the cooker and jars by adjusting heat to a relatively high setting to obtain a free flow of steam from the vent pipe. Allow steam to flow for 5 minutes. Place the pressure regulator on the vent pipe. Continue heating
until 15 pounds pressure is reached.

Process vegetables according to chart.

Canning Meat and Poultry

Cut meat or poultry into pieces convenient for canning. Precook meat until red color changes to light brown. Precook poultry until medium done. Precooking can be done by boiling, frying, or roasting.

To precook by boiling, make a concentrated broth from bones and meat or poultry trimmings. Heat to boiling and precook meat or poultry in broth. Meat should not be browned with flour, nor should flour be used in the gravy of meat used for canning.

Pack hot meat or poultry into clean jars leaving one inch head space. Do not pack tightly. Salt may be added, 1/2 teaspoon for each pint, or it may be added at serving time. Cover with hot liquid broth, meat juice or water. It is important to leave one inch head space.

Adjust cap closure according to manufacturer's instructions. Follow the specific directions for the operations of your cooker. Place boiling water, cooking rack and jars in the cooker. Close cover securely. Do not place the pressure regulator on the vent pipe. Exhaust air from the cooker and jars by adjusting heat to a relatively high setting to obtain a free flow of steam from the vent pipe. Allow steam to flow for 5 minutes. Place the pressure regulator on the vent pipe. Continue heating until 15 pounds pressure is reached.

Process meat and poultry according to chart.

Canning Fish and Seafood

Only fresh fish should be canned and these should be bled and thoroughly cleaned of all viscera and membranes when caught, or as soon as possible. Canning should be restricted to proven varieties where it is definitely known that a product of good quality may be obtained.

Clams, Whole (Littleneck)
Scrub clams and soak overnight in 10% brine. Open clams and wash in salted water using 1 tablespoon salt for each quart of water. Cover clam meat with boiling water, to which 1/8 teaspoon citric acid crystals have been added to each quart of water. Allow to stand 1 minute. Pack loosely into clean, hot Mason jars, leaving 1 inch head space. Cover with hot concentrated clam juice to 1/4 inch from top. Adjust jar lids. Process according to chart.

Crab
Place crabs in ice water 1 - 2 minutes. Separate claws from body, remove waste portions, and wash thoroughly. Place bodies and claws with 2 cups water in cooker, and cook 5 minutes at 15 pounds pressure. Cool cooker at once. Remove meat from shells. Wash thoroughly in salted water using 1/2 cup salt to 2 quarts water. Drain and dip in solu
vegemm photos
Joined: 11/07/2003
Location: Oregon
Posts: 1968
Posted: Aug/20/2006 2:03 AM PST

Amigatec they also have a web site that is full of information...as well as Kerr and Ball

also here is a few other good sites with information

http://www.homecanning.com/usa/ALBasics.asp
http://www.canning-food-recipes.com/
Amigatec
Joined: 8/19/2006
Location: Oklahoma Zone 6b
Posts: 179
Posted: Aug/20/2006 2:36 AM PST

For me canning 4 pints at a time is all I need sometimes.

My garden isn't that big where I need to use the big 21 qt model.
RandyCobb
Joined: 4/04/2002
Location: Yamhill County, Oregon
Posts: 1078
Posted: Aug/20/2006 1:56 PM PST

I have two of the 21 quart jobs. Sometimes I have both of them going.
Amigatec
Joined: 8/19/2006
Location: Oklahoma Zone 6b
Posts: 179
Posted: Aug/20/2006 2:42 PM PST

If I had a bigger Garden I might also, my garden is only 30X40.
RandyCobb
Joined: 4/04/2002
Location: Yamhill County, Oregon
Posts: 1078
Posted: Aug/21/2006 3:38 AM PST

That's a pretty good size garden. Mine is a little bigger, about 1700 square feet.
Amigatec
Joined: 8/19/2006
Location: Oklahoma Zone 6b
Posts: 179
Posted: Aug/21/2006 11:54 AM PST

I have a LOT more space I can use. I bought the property behind my house, and tore down the old burnt up house that was there. I also added a Strawberry patch, and Asparagus bed and some blackberry plants. I planted Rhubarb but the heat has killed it.
vegemm photos
Joined: 11/07/2003
Location: Oregon
Posts: 1968
Posted: Aug/21/2006 1:03 PM PST

Well then next year you will be cannoing away...I thought I would add the sites not only for you ...but your information was great and so others may add along the way and have a great thread for canning...
Amigatec
Joined: 8/19/2006
Location: Oklahoma Zone 6b
Posts: 179
Posted: Aug/21/2006 2:10 PM PST

For me canning 4 pints at a time works good, sometimes that is all I have ready to can. Also the pressure is higher so the heat is higher and I can be sure all the bad stuff is dead!!!
RandyCobb
Joined: 4/04/2002
Location: Yamhill County, Oregon
Posts: 1078
Posted: Aug/21/2006 2:16 PM PST

I meant to tell you that too. Thanks for posting that article from Presto. That's good information. Most of the stuff I can is high-acid. But I do can a fair amount of green beans and that's when I use the pressure canners. On my next trip to Alaska, we are planning on canning some soup in AQ's new pressure canner.
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