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Roma tomato bottom rot

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locolobo
Joined: 7/16/2006
Location:
Posts: 7
Posted: Jul/30/2006 1:54 AM PST

I have 3 varieties of tomatoes growing in extremely large patio pots half filled with mulch in the bottom and then topped off with a mix of Scotts Garden Soil and Scotts Moisture Control Soil. Also I have a wide variety of bell peppers mixed in. The reason for this arrangement is of course due to being cursed with apartment living.

I have already harvested a dozen and a half fully vine ripened baseball sized tomatoes and all plants are bursting with fruits. I fertilize according to manufactures guide-lines and water religiously. I dust weekly and am fervent about pest control especially horn worms.

My problem is this tonight I went to check the fruit and discovered that my Roma in one container had blackened on the bottom tips and I scoured each and every plant of all types to discover it only occurred to this type tomato and I quickly picked every afflicted fruit. I pulled these apart and found that the rot went straight up the center core of the fruit so I destroyed every one and dusted again.

Anyone have any idea what might select only Roma tomatoes or what this might be and how to fix it?

Any help at all would be appreciated. Thanks.
vegemm photos
Joined: 11/07/2003
Location: Oregon
Posts: 1968
Posted: Jul/30/2006 12:40 PM PST

Blossom-end rot is caused by a lack of calcium in the soil...... and/or inconsistent watering. If you are having a dry season I think I remember reading that the plants gas a harder time asorbing the nutrients.....Usually it is just the first few fruit that will have this problem...If in the spring you remember to add a bit of epsom salt......Simply mix one or two teaspoons of epsom salts to the soil when planting...... Then once the plant begins flowering....... apply a spray of 1 tbs. epsom salts to one gallon of water liberally on the plants once per month......then also you may want to mulch the plants with 3" of straw or aged grass clippings....should help you out...
DanS blog
Joined: 3/23/2005
Location:
Posts: 116
Posted: Jul/30/2006 2:52 PM PST

:::::::::::::oints to Vegemm answer::::::::::

hit that one on the head
Byron
Joined: 4/16/2003
Location: NH
Posts: 195
Posted: Jul/30/2006 4:39 PM PST

You need to add calcium as in crushed egg shell, lime, tums with clacium or dried dog food,


Excess nitrogen can cause BER
locolobo
Joined: 7/16/2006
Location:
Posts: 7
Posted: Jul/30/2006 5:12 PM PST

Thanks Everyone I Appreciate All Your Help
vegemm photos
Joined: 11/07/2003
Location: Oregon
Posts: 1968
Posted: Jul/30/2006 11:31 PM PST

As Byron said the crushed egg shells would help a bunch now ...also will help with any slugs you may have ...cuts them up as they go over them...you can also get crushed oyster shell at your feed store and that is a help...Glad I knew somethiig to help out......Also wanted to say welcome to GG...Nice to meet you ...I am sure you will find many here that can help with questions...
jbb2388
Joined: 7/28/2003
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 265
Posted: Jul/31/2006 12:26 PM PST

BER is more of a watering problem than a calcium availability issue. This is a very common misconception.
Byron
Joined: 4/16/2003
Location: NH
Posts: 195
Posted: Jul/31/2006 12:52 PM PST

The lack of calcium in potting soils is very common, as the potting soil does not contain calcium, nor do 99% of the fertilizers.

The original poster said he was growing in pots..
vegemm photos
Joined: 11/07/2003
Location: Oregon
Posts: 1968
Posted: Jul/31/2006 4:54 PM PST

I have to agree with Byron...I have read much on this and did my own experiments and found the not having enough calcium...weather from the soil missing it of the plant not absorbing it was the trouble..
jbb2388
Joined: 7/28/2003
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 265
Posted: Aug/01/2006 2:18 PM PST

That is true about container growing as most potting mixes are made with peat and don't have much in the way of nutrients. BER is more common in container-grown tomato plants. This is why it's recommended to add a couple tablespoons of dolomitic limestone to the mix to both counteract the low pH of the mix caused by the peat and to add calcium and magnesium. Most bales of Promix has it already in it. But you could add all the calcium the plant needs to the soil and still get BER if your watering practices are inconsistant. Garden grown plants with BER are usually never a result of the lack of calcium in the soil. Inconsistant watering is most often to blame. Some varieties like paste tomatoes are also more prone to developing BER than others with all other things being equal.
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